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Steganography techniques that deliver malware

    Researchers at Blackberry’s Cylance Labs have discovered novel techniques utilizing steganography, the practice of concealing a file, message, image, or video within another file, message, image, or video, to load malware payloads onto victims’ machines. 

    The Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) group “OceanLotus”, primarily believed to be Vietnam-based, is using steganography techniques to deliver malware backdoors on compromised systems. The malware loader utilizes steganography techniques to read an encrypted payload contained within an image file to decrypt and execute the malicious payload which loads one of two backdoors onto the machine. The backdoors are associated with OceanLotus’ parent cyber espionage group, APT32, and were first discovered back in 2017, namely the Denes backdoor and the Remy backdoor. 

    Researchers at Cylance labs pointed out that it would not be difficult to swap out the backdoors for some other malicious payload and that what is essential is the tactic of using steganography to hide the payload and that it would still be just as effective. The threat actor would encode the image with their payload of choice before distributing it with a simple decoder to the target.   The obfuscation of the malware payload loading portion of the technique is what’s impressive from a security detection point of analysis.

    The group has seemingly avoided discovery using common steganography detection techniques. To accomplish this, they utilize the “bespoke” tool to encode data into the images using a least significant bit approach to both minimize visual differences between the encoded image with it’s original and to avoid detection/ analysis by discovery tools.

    “The user does not interact with the image (nor is the image sent via email), rather the image is used to hide the payload from analysts/tools/monitoring software. In a way, the payload is hiding in plain sight, as an image carrying a payload will be virtually indistinguishable from an original image”, said Tom Bonner, BlackBerry Cylance director of threat research.  

    The payload, once executed and loaded onto the machine, then downloads Dynamic Link Libraries (DLL) and Command and Control communications libraries that are heavily obfuscated with large quantities of useless junk code, said researchers from Cylance. The junk code significantly inflates the library’s size which makes both static analysis and debugging more difficult.

Source:
• https://cyware.com/news/oceanlotus-threat-actor-group-leveragessteganography-to-deliver-backdoors-781be11c 

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