OneLogin’s Reseller Channel Update

By recruiting high-quality partners with a broad reach, the identity and access management provider plans for its channel-only future. By James E. Gaskin
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The company’s access solution controls authentication for users across cloud and on-premises applications.

Since OneLogin Inc. was founded in the spring of 2010, its goal has been to “simplify identity and access management.” Currently OneLogin has more than 1,400 customers in over 40 countries serviced by 200-plus employees. In 2013, the company’s channel program became critical to sales efforts.

Headquartered in San Francisco, OneLogin started out selling direct, says Josh Greene, the company’s vice president of sales and business development. “In 2013, we made a strategic decision to differentiate ourselves as a channel-centric organization. Our partner contribution has grown over 300 percent year over year, and in the first quarter of 2016, half of our new customer deals came through the channel.”

Greene says the company leadership has more than 30 years of channel experience and its strategy is “built on the fabric of partnerships.” Easy to say, perhaps, but Greene insists that OneLogin’s goal is to get 100 percent of all business through its partners, and the company is well on its way to reaching that goal.

Starting early with CDW and SHI linked OneLogin with partners selling into enterprises as those companies moved to the cloud, primarily motivated by Microsoft Office 365. Greene says the company’s best reseller prospects now are “those companies helping their customers make the transition to a cloud world.” Since OneLogin covers the globe, one might think only huge resellers need apply. Not true, says Greene. “We do have customers with millions of users, but we’re actively searching for partners with expertise in the midmarket and down to the SMB world.”

Since identity and authentication is critical to every system, OneLogin is about as horizontal a product as you can get. That said, Greene seeks reseller partners servicing underserved customer groups in education, retail, manufacturing, and more. The company’s access solution controls resource authentication for employees, partners, and customers across cloud and on-premises applications from all manner of devices.

Neutral Sales Compensation
Salespeople follow the money, no matter what management says. OneLogin’s account executive’s compensation is 100 percent neutral, says Greene, so whether direct or through the channel, salespeople receive the same compensation. He believes it’s the only neutral plan in the industry.

Currently OneLogin has a small reseller base because of its focus on working with fewer partners of higher quality and wider reach. Wary of reseller churn, the company turned many applicants away early on because there was no good way to evaluate them remotely. They want partners with a commitment, not just one customer interested in OneLogin.

“We understand some companies have bad channel etiquette,” says Greene. “The resellers are right to be wary of introducing new vendors to their customers.” His goal has been to create zero channel conflict, and he proudly reiterates that OneLogin has never taken a partner-initiated deal direct.

OneLogin has what Greene calls a “transparent, no-nonsense deal registration process.” The relatively short sales cycle of between 15 and 60 days comes from the work OneLogin has already done to integrate more than 5,000 different applications into its product. What Greene calls “the only real-time Active Directory sync” in the business satisfies customers looking to run a real-time organization.

Other partner support materials include a catalog of resources to help educate both partners and their customers on access management. The company’s YouTube channel includes four videos, with more on the way. Product sheets can be branded by partners.

Greene feels the biggest opportunity for OneLogin is educating its partners that working together will give them greater relevance with their customer base. “We assist in the management and deployment of applications like Office 365, Box, Adobe, Google Apps, and 5,000 more applications.” Partners working with the company are able to “sell more cloud” to their customers, and get a “larger wallet share.”

“Hybrid IT is not going anywhere,” says Greene. Since customers need to authenticate from every device to every application one way or another, he looks for partners helping their customers by providing modern access management as they move to the cloud.

About the Author

James E. Gaskin is a freelance writer and former reseller based in Mesquite, Texas. He writes frequently for The ChannelPro Network.