IT and Business Insights for SMB Solution Providers

3 Office 365 Mobile Misconceptions

These tips from a Microsoft partner strategist will help you debunk SMB misconceptions about O365. By Geoffrey Oldmixon

Increasingly, business culture is mandating accessibility and a respond-from-anyplace work ethic. Though Google Apps and Apple Productivity Apps (i.e. iWork) pose a competitive alternative to Office 365, Microsoft Corp. still has the brand recognition and cross-platform advantage.

Onur Dogruoz, partner technology strategist, TS2, at Microsoft, doesn’t want to take that for granted. He attended D&H’s Mid-Atlantic Summer Technology Show and told his channel partners, “Office 365 is the complete productivity platform—business-class email; file sharing capabilities with Sharepoint online; and online meeting, conferencing, and phone capabilities.” He adds, “Since they are all hosted in the cloud, you will have access to all these services anywhere in the world, wherever you have Internet access.”

Though Dogruoz sees Office 365 as a fairly easy sell, he concedes there are misconceptions among SMBs about the product. At the D&H show, he sought to debunk these myths.

  1. It’s just Office apps in the cloud. Dogruoz is quick to point out that Office 365 is much more than just Microsoft Office. “It’s the full office client plus email, file sharing, HD video conferencing, and more,” he says. “You can log in and view and edit documents within a browser.”
  2. You can’t work offline. “Office 365 provides the same experience as 2016 Professional Plus, with apps installed locally and available offline,” he explains.
  3. Storage requires the Internet. Not so, says Dogruoz. “You can store locally,” he says. “You can disable the cloud completely.”

Another key sales point: expansive versatility. As Dogruoz puts it, a single license goes a long way. “With each [Pro Plus] user subscription, you will be able to install Office 365 in up to five PCs or Macs and up to five tablets or smartphones. It comes with locally installed desktop versions of Office. You can run earlier versions of Office in unison.”

About the Author

Geoffrey Oldmixon is a freelance writer based in Western Massachusetts.